Tewa

Weaving Philanthropy Into Relief Work

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After the 7.8 Earthquake of 25th April, 2015 and a few significant others which followed, all of us had to go into relief work.  Although this was a new on the job learning for many of us, we used our common sense and a sense of urgency recognizing how most the affected people had suffered multiple major losses.  The two organizations I founded in Nepal Tewa – the Nepal women's fund, and Nagarik Aawaz for peace, decided to work jointly with a synergistic approach.  The earlier 2 weeks were spent in grounding systems, values, and our approach.  These were premised on a hypothesis that when disaster/s of this magnitude strike, people are taken off their balance and they suffer great losses. This will temporarily paralyze, numb, or traumatize them.  But essentially they are the same as any of us.  Their values and principles remain the same if not further honed.  Their inherent altruistic nature or goodness cannot change.  We decided to serve with the same respect that was due to them earlier and not reduce them to be VICTIMS.

Help Tewa, the Nepal Women's Fund, get their community partners back on their feet

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Nepal is reeling from the immediate effects of the earthquake that hit the country on 25th April 2015. As the immediate emergency response gets underway and in the reconstruction that follows, it will be crucial for local needs and voices to be taken into consideration and that grassroots groups are part of efforts to rebuild, strengthen, and expand sustainable development in Nepal's rural areas.

It is Not One or the Other, But All Together…


The world is at a point and time in its evolution, when a shift – and a very rapid one at that – is inevitable.  In fact it is already happening.  To take a broad sweep – rapid environmental degradation, hazards, and disasters; increasing conflicts; weakening - or in countries like mine, failing States; and widening disproportionate economic gaps between people, are only a few of the markers.  Like never before, with the help of technology and communications we are more connected as people.  Despite colour, taste, size, location, interests, we are increasingly realizing that as humans we are basically the same.   Essentially we are not happy when we do something wrong e.g.

Do not kill or hijack...


Over twenty years of working in this field of social justice philanthropy in Nepal, I continue to be struck by the resilience of the local communities, their home-grown leaderships, and the way they innovate and improvise to sustain and nurture each other as far as it is possible!  During a recent visit to several districts of the far-west Nepal, visiting with Tewa grantees and women activists, I was blown away when this was reaffirmed for me yet one more time! 

An Act of Altruism Expands Beyond the Expected

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The story is borrowed from Sagar Prasain’s facebook and is located in Kathmandu.

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